Painting in damp weather

The sometimes damp Edinburgh weather can make it difficult when you are doing internal painting. Below are some tips to help you out in this situation.

  • Close all the windows and doors in your home or place of business and keep them closed as much as possible.
  • Try setting up a dehumidifier in the room or rooms where walls will be painted.
  • If you have any exhaust fans in the home (Kitchen or Bathroom) switch them on to remove the humid air from the interior.
  • Turn on all ceiling fans and set up floor fans to circulate and dry out the air throughout the house.
  • Check all the walls so see if there is any moisture. Wipe the walls with kitchen towels to remove excess moisture and then wait until the walls are completely dry before painting.
  • Ensure the fans and dehumidifying devices stay on until the paint has dried for at least 48 hours; longer if need be.

Painting a Panel Door

Below you will see a video on how to paint a panel door from Crown Paints. We have a few more tips to expand on the excellent video and make it easier for you at the end of the video.

  • Remember to wedge door open. You can use a wooden or rubber wedge or you can even use a rolled up newspaper. If using a wooden wedge be careful not to kick it out afterwards as this can split the bottom edge of the door.
  • Put cardboard, newspapers or even some lining paper under the door to protect floor or carpet.
  • If possible remove all handles, locks and other fittings (obviously, except hinges) from the door as this will make painting easier. When you remove handles and locks dust behind thoroughly and blow out the dust from the lock cavity as this can easily end up in your paint. Also watch for new doors having sawdust in the lock cavity.
  • Recomended brushes are 1 x 1″ (25mm) and 1 x 2″(50mm), optionally you can also have a 3″(75mm).
  • Keep checking back for runs, especially with gloss paint. The most likely places for runs to develop are the bottom corners of panels and across the top moulding of panels.
  • Check build-up of paint in the corners of panels by dabbing with the tips of the brush bristles (like the action of vey gently throwing a dart, but obviously much gentler.
  • Always try and remove runs by using an upward motion of the brush but where there is a marked cross grain, leave off in the direction of the grain.

If you require any profession help, please feel free to contact Stockbridge Decorators on 0131-312-6910 or Mobile: 0793-913-6561 or follow us on twitter @StockbridgeDeco. You can also contact us by email by clicking here and completing our contact form.

Masonry paint and preparation

Masonry paint, unlike emulsion paint, is especially formulated to give a long-lasting, external all weather protection. Its flexible, resists flaking and is suitable for exterior application on roughcast, concrete, stock, facing bricks, and/cement rendering, pebbledash – so don’t be tempted to save money and use anything else, it’ll end up costing you time and money, sooner than you think. By doing the job properly and using the best paint you can afford, you’ll probably not have to repaint the outside of your house for the next 15 to 20 years (this assumes normal conditions).

Before you paint, ensure the surface is clean, sound and free from mould. What you use to achieve this state is dependent on the present wall surface. A stiff brush or an anti-fungal wash, should do the job but if its bad, you may have to use a light power wash – but be careful and let the wall dry out fully, before applying paint.

Once you have a good, clean, dry surface, you should patch test the wall (see below). If you are painting more than one wall or the whole house and garage, patch test each wall separately – don’t assume they’ll be all the same.

New surfaces: All surfaces should be clean, sound, clean and dry. Free from anything that will interfere with the adhesion of the paint. Patch test and stabilise the surface as required.

Uncoated surfaces: As with ‘new surfaces’, all surfaces must be sound, dry and free from anything that will interfere with the adhesion of the paint. You must remove all organic growth by scraping or brushing with a stiff, none wire, brush. Established growth may need to be removed by pressure washing but be careful not to damage the underlying surface or force water through joins. If it is really bad, you may have to consider wet or dry grit blasting. When this is done, treat the surface with a fungicidal wash. Allow to dry and fill any cracks. Patch test and stabilise the surface as required.

Previously decorated surfaces: As with ‘new surfaces’, all surfaces must be sound, dry and free from anything that will interfere with the adhesion of the paint. Loose or failing paint must be removed. Washing the surface with a liquid detergent or a sugar soap solution will remove contaminants and improve paint adhesion. Any glossy or eggshell paint surfaces must be abraded to provide a key. Any organic growth must be removed by scraping or brushing with a stiff, none wire, brush.

Established growth may need to be removed by pressure washing but be careful not to damage the underlying surface or force water through joins. When this is done, treat the surface with a fungicidal wash. Allow to dry and fill any cracks. Patch test and stabilise the surface as required.

Paint Drying and drying times

Paint Drying Machine

Paint Drying Machine - The REVO 180

A manufacturers’ quoted drying time is just a guide. It assumes the paint is applied correctly onto a well prepared surface, in normal temperature and humidity, subject to good ventilation. Only you know how the paint has been applied and in what conditions, so times will vary.

Try not to apply paint in extremes of temperature but if you do, you must except that you may not get a perfect finish, no matter how good the paint. Too cold or humid, it will take an age to dry, and if allowed to become wet or freeze, it
will ruin the finish.

Too hot, and you will quickly loose your wet edge, the paint surface will dry very quickly (possibly, in the time it takes to reload your roller or brush) and will look patchy. This can be a particular problem with modern high opacity emulsion paints, especially when painting a ceiling in the middle of a summer heat wave but it will also affect solvent and water-based trim (used on wood and metal) paints. In the case of a water-based paint, about 5% of water can be added to help extend the wet edge in such conditions.

Paint, when applied onto a nonporous surface, dries from the outside, in. The first drying stage is ‘Touch Dry’; this is when the paint appears not sticky to the lightest touch but still soft underneath. Paint will continue to harden as the carrier medium (this is either the solvent or water, which holds the paint in suspension) evaporates into the atmosphere. When the paint appears to be fully dry to the touch, this is known as the ‘Dry Time’ and the point at which the paint becomes ‘Recoatable’ (i.e. time quoted on the tin). This is the earliest point when a further coat can be applied without damaging the previous one. Whilst the paint appears to be dry, it is not hard and will continue to harden over a period of time. This is why we ask you not to wipe clean paint for at least 7 days after application. Some solvent based paints, depending on applied thickness, can take over a month to become fully dry, so don’t rub too hard.

Selecting and understanding Paint

Understanding PaintTraditionally, water-based paints were used on walls and ceilings, and solvent-based paints for wood and metal but times have changed. This article and others on this site should dispel that myth and give you an idea of the many paint varieties available, their preparation and uses.

Another thing to consider is that legislation is changing the way paints are formulated, so, the paint you are about to use may have subtly changed from that of a year ago. An example of this is the reduction in VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) in solvent based paints. This has the effect of increasing the drying time, no matter which brand you use, and because of this, it is very important you read the product instructions before use.

Coverage and drying times are only a guide, in real life, how the paint is applied, the porosity of the surface, ambient temperature, humidity and amount of ventilation will all have an effect.

The top ten Golden Rules of painting

The Top Ten Golden Rules of Painting

  1. Always read instructions on the paint can carefully and follow them
  2. Use access equipment properly. Don’t take short cuts
  3. Wear sensible clothing and, especially, masks or other items designed to protect you
  4. Use the right tools for the job.
  5. Select the correct paint for the purpose. An interior paint will not last long outside
  6. Only paint when conditions are suitable
  7. Two thin coats of paint are always better than one thick coat
  8. Clean utensils immediately after use. Do not allow paint to dry on brushes or rollers
  9. Plan the work carefully with your current project.
  10. Prepare surfaces properly. Bad preparation means a poor finish that will not last.